Fashion revolution week and more denim art

I recently came across the fashion revolution. Largely brought about in response to the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse in Bangladesh 5 years ago. I’m glad there was an organization created to bring about awareness of how our clothes are made, asking ourselves #whomademyclothes ? To be a part of this you don’t have to make your own clothes, but just be conscious about where your clothes come from, and how they were made. It doesn’t even matter how much you pay for your clothes, they could be still be made by sweat labor, as was proved by this tragedy in Bangladesh.

It’s funny how inspiration works. I was pleasantly going along working on my new jeggings, when I noticed my top stitching resembled staples. Then I recalled this really cool leather-goods boutique in Boston where two artists collaborated to create bags, clothes, and jewelry from staple embellished leather. Of course I’m running with it! I’m also going to try to make myself one of those bracelets to go with the whole black and silver outfit! Black and silver is my THANG, inspired by my changing hair. I feel like my hair is being bejeweled! And when it goes completely white that will be a whole new, awesome look as well

The second pair, not as far along. Embellished with black beads. Kinda reminds me of a checkered racing flag.

Boston…St. Patrick’s day 2018

What a whirlwind of a weekend! But first, the beginning. Starting our journey south had us stopping into the Coastal Cafe and Bakery in Searsport, Maine and having a delicious handmade bagel and cream cheese. A couple hours later found us in downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire which is this amazing shopping Mecca! I could have easily just spent all my money in that one town and gone home! My favorite find was this New York style hat and accessory shop Puttin’ on the Glitz. That’s where I bought my first Cha Cha. Cha Cha’s House of Ill Repute is a millinery in Manhattan that specializes in steampunky hats: traditional with a twist.

Lady Pickwick’s is a Victorian era ladies mercantile. That’s where I discovered Maggie Mowbray, a milliner in Edinburgh U.K. who’s head wear has been featured in movies, and worn by royalty. Another “store” of note is actually a art gallery called NAHCOTTA, they carry some TiroTiro jewelry and other enormous tiny art. After a quick bite to eat we were on the road again. Salem, Massachusetts is where my host/coworker/boss/friend has a house, this was our “home base”. Friends met us for dinner at a Ramen restaurant, Kokeshi. What an interesting mix we made! A lawyer, a social worker for veterans, a speech therapist, an entrepreneur, and two artists. For dessert we walked over to a random pop-up and grabbed a fatty, (which is what they call their cookies). Then to a late night coffee shop for a night cap and live music.

Kokeshi! Love the decor.

First time on a commuter train! You can see Boston in the back ground.

First stop: fuel. Tatte, is a beautiful bakery and cafe on Charles street.

Beacon Hill neighborhood!

If Boston had a “fashion district” it would be (in my opinion) Newbury street. Ouimille was the very first boutique we went into and it had a rack of clothes by a local indie designer, Natalie Busby. Unfortunately none of what they had in stock fit me quite right but it was exceptionally stunning. All Saints was another where I bought nothing but the cuts and styling stimulated the imagination.

Ministry of Supply was another clothing boutique of note. They specialize in office wear made of fabric that had all these wonderful qualities but what I was REALLY interested in was what they had 3D print-knitted! Still not sure how it all works but there is supposed to be zero waste. I bought two 3D print-knit sweaters that are super fine, light-weight but warm, and did I mention 3D printed?!

Discovered another American made jean company! Discovered Nordstrom’s rack! Hmmmmm…. put those two together!!

All kinds of random fun, and the original Boston Cream Pie!

Back in Salem we went to the Peabody-Essex Museum to see the Georgia O Keefe exhibit. I didn’t know she made much of her own clothes! The care, craftsmanship, and detailing on simple styles was unbelievably inspiring!

Now to home and back to creating!!